Surfing Just Became The Official Sport Of California

Surfing, California’s favorite pastime, just became the official sport of the Golden State.

 

Celebratory surf session in Newport Beach, CA

 

It was signed into law by California Governor Jerry Brown on Monday, and both surfers and politicians have been celebrating by doing exactly what you might expect - spending time out on the water.

“I am stoked that surfing is now California’s official sport,” said Al Muratsuchi, state Assemblyman of Torrance, California, a surfer himself.  

We’re stoked too, Al. Surfing has always been the unofficial sport of California since it made it's way to the Golden State from across the Pacific. Throughout the 20th century, the identity and perception of California has been massively shaped by surf culture. The sport and state have a long history together, beaten out only by Hawaii where surfing was born (and has been the official sport since 1998).

But can both states claim surfing as their own? According to surfers, the real experts on the matter, the answer is along the lines of “Yeah dude, why not?” Hawaii is the birthplace of surfing, but California’s contribution to the sport - technologically and culturally - is a huge part of what modern surfing is today.

Famous spots along the California coast like Monterey, Manhattan, Malibu, and Huntington - beyond being recognizable in the Beach Boys hugely famous song Surfin’ USA - are credited as the origin of modern surfing. It was at these famous beaches the sport received some seriously gnarly upgrades: boards were shaped to become lighter, more hydrodynamic, easier to use, and eventually equipped with fins.

Of course, California’s always been proud of it’s entrepreneurship, so it seems appropriate for Californians to embrace a sport they were a big part of improving as their own.

And the fun doesn't stop at fins. Recently, advancements in surfing have largely been focused on bringing the sport to places it’s never been before, even *gasp* outside of the ocean. Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch is the latest and greatest of this ocean-less wave technology, allowing beautifully sculpted waves to be built outside a large body of water. That being said, it’s perhaps fitting (although slightly ironic) that the surf ranch, the first artificial surf spot of this scale, is in California, not even 3 hours from the coast.

But that’s why it’s our official sport, right? California has and will always been enamored with surfing, and that's just the way we like it.

Leo Braudy, a cultural historian at the University of Southern California, sums up this relationship between state and sport well: "It's part of the California mythology. The idea of someone becoming Californianized, and if you become Californianized then surfing is part of the deal."

 

I bet your Assemblyman doesn't use the word 'stoked'

 

Surfing Just Became The Official Sport Of California

Surfing, California’s favorite pastime, just became the official sport of the Golden State.

 

 

It was signed into law by California Governor Jerry Brown on Monday, and both surfers and politicians have been celebrating by doing exactly what you would expect - spending time out on the water.

“I am stoked that surfing is now California’s official sport,” said Al Muratsuchi, state Assemblyman of Torrance, California, a surfer himself.  

We’re stoked too, Al. Surfing has always been the unofficial sport of California since it made it's way to the Golden State from across the Pacific. Throughout the 20th century, the identity and perception of California has been massively shaped by surf culture. The sport and state have a long history together, beaten out only by Hawaii where surfing was born (and has been the official sport since 1998).

But can both states claim surfing as their own? According to surfers, the real experts on the matter, the answer is along the lines of “Yeah dude, why not?” Hawaii is the birthplace of surfing, but California’s contribution to the sport - technologically and culturally - is a huge part of what modern surfing is today.

Famous spots along the California coast like Monterey, Manhattan, Malibu, and Huntington - beyond being recognizable in the Beach Boys hugely famous song Surfin’ USA - are credited as the origin of modern surfing. It was at these famous beaches the sport received some seriously gnarly upgrades: boards were shaped to become lighter, more hydrodynamic, easier to use, and eventually equipped with fins.

Of course, California’s always been proud of it’s entrepreneurship, so it seems appropriate for Californians to embrace a sport they were a big part of improving as their own.

And the fun doesn't stop at fins. Recently, advancements in surfing have largely involved bringing the sport to places it’s never been before, even *gasp* outside of the ocean. Kelly Slater’s Surf Ranch is the latest and greatest of this ocean-less wave technology, allowing beautifully sculpted waves to be built outside a large body of water. That being said, it’s perhaps fitting (although slightly ironic) that the surf ranch, the first artificial surf spot of this scale, is in California, not even 3 hours from the coast.

But that’s why it’s our official sport, right? California has and will always been enamored with surfing, and that's just the way we like it.

Leo Braudy, a cultural historian at the University of Southern California, sums up this relationship between state and sport well: "It's part of the California mythology. The idea of someone becoming Californianized, and if you become Californianized then surfing is part of the deal."

 

I bet your Assemblyman doesn't use the word 'stoked'

 

How Two Beach Bums Started a Successful Lifestyle Company


It all began with a few kayaks and an old pickup truck.

When the recession struck in 2008, Michael Samer and Christopher Lynch quickly discovered that they didn’t have a ton of career options, especially for graduates fresh out of college. What they did have was the beach, an unemployed status, a lot of time and nothing to lose.

These humble beginnings are the origins of Everyday California. It was a little adventure company run out of a storage shed in La Jolla by a couple of beach bums with a big idea: share the California lifestyle with the world.

 

The original beach bums, Michael Samer (left) and Chris Lynch (right)

 

Compared to today, the image is comical - the first iteration was a small crew organizing and leading tours, cleaning gear and scheduling more tours on a cell phone whenever they had a free moment. At times it was brutal, but they soon realized something special was happening.

Things went quick. The storage unit was replaced by a shop, a few more people joined the crew, they got some more gear and started looking like a real business. This was the big-leagues, they thought. This was success.

 

Big-league success for the salty crew

But in time, they outgrew the first shop and found a bigger space. And then they outgrew the second shop. And the third. Now the location now is bigger and better than it’s ever been.

All the while something else was in development. There was another unique opportunity - visitors from all over the world were visiting the shop and getting a taste of the California people know and love. Mike and Chris wanted to leave them with more than just a great memory, something tangible as well.

This was the full realization of Everyday California’s growth. It’s transformed from an adventure company into a full-blown lifestyle brand, making waves in the community and spreading good vibes across the globe through an awesome selection of California designed apparel.

 

The current Everyday California shop in La Jolla, CA

 

This is the Everyday California of today. It stands for all things CA: from North to South, from massive forests full of towering Sequoias to rocky beaches with walking access only, from the tech giants in Silicon valley to mom and-pop stores selling overstuffed sandwiches down the street from our shop.

We hope you’ll join us in our mission to share California with the rest of the world.

 


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