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Record Breaking Ocean Temperatures Make San Diego Water Feel Like Hawaii's

Whether you’ve been to Southern California or not, it’s pretty easy to assume that temperatures can get pretty hot in the summer. That’s usually the case, although Summer 2018 is having its moment in the sunlight due to some record breaking conditions out in the water.

 

Scripps Pier, where oceanographers take daily samples of the water

So what, the weather and water are just a bit warmer?

Yes, but in some unusual ways. It’s not uncommon to see temperatures in the 80’s around the coast and up towards 100 further inland here around San Diego, but this summer’s persistent heat is doing more than raising your energy bill - it’s helping warm the ocean temperature to record-breaking levels.

Our friends at Scripps Institute of Oceanography take note of exactly how warm or cold the water is, and this year they found that the water off of Scripps pier (a mere mile away from our shop) is the warmest they’ve ever recorded.

These oceanographers have been performing the scientific method of putting their toe in the water to see how it feels for 102 years now, and the San Diego Union Tribune reported that on the first of the month they found that the water reached 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit, beating out the previous record of 78.4 degrees set in 1931.

But while we’re all splashing around in water similar to Hawaii’s with our giant inflatable animals, our friendly neighborhood oceanographers are busy figuring out what’s going on.

According to Scripps, water temperatures here in San Diego have been abnormally warm since 2014 due to a “marine heatwave,” and continued to heat up after a particularly strong El Nino (a temporary change in ocean temperature around the equator resulting in warm weather on the coast).

Now, according to the National Weather Service a “pesky high pressure system” is sitting on the southwestern United States, which means the next few days will continue to be toasty.

At our shop, everyone’s stoked about the water temperature. We even had local news channel ABC 10 come in to hang out, grab a couple interviews, and even go out on a couple of kayaks with us. Check out the segment below:

 

Credit: ABC 10News (and shoutout to Peter, one of our managers)

 

Bottom line: grab your swimsuits and snorkels and celebrate the warm water while it lasts - because if I know anything about the Pacific Ocean here in California, it's that it will get cold again.

It's getting hot in here

 

Record Breaking Ocean Temperatures Make San Diego Water Feel Like Hawaii's

Whether you’ve been to Southern California or not, it’s pretty easy to assume that temperatures can get pretty hot in the summer. That’s usually the case, although Summer 2018 is having its moment in the sunlight due to some record breaking conditions out in the water.

So what, the weather and water are just a bit warmer?

Yes, but in some unusual ways. It’s not uncommon to see temperatures in the 80’s around the coast and up towards 100 further inland here around San Diego, but this summer’s persistent heat is doing more than raising your energy bill - it’s helping warm the ocean temperature to record-breaking levels.

Our friends at Scripps Institute of Oceanography take note of exactly how warm or cold the water is, and this year they found that the water off of Scripps pier (a mere mile away from our shop) is the warmest they’ve ever recorded.

 

Scripps Pier, where oceanographers take daily samples of the water

 

These oceanographers have been performing the scientific method of putting their toe in the water to see how it feels for 102 years now, and the San Diego Union Tribune reported that on the first of the month they found that the water reached 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit, beating out the previous record of 78.4 degrees set in 1931.But while we’re all splashing around in water similar to Hawaii’s with our giant inflatable animals, our friendly neighborhood oceanographers are busy figuring out what’s going on.

According to Scripps, water temperatures here in San Diego have been abnormally warm since 2014 due to a “marine heatwave,” and continued to heat up after a particularly strong El Nino (a temporary change in ocean temperature around the equator resulting in warm weather on the coast).

Now, according to the National Weather Service a “pesky high pressure system” is sitting on the southwestern United States, which means the next few days will continue to be toasty.

At our shop, everyone’s stoked about the water temperature. We even had local news channel ABC 10 come in to hang out, grab a couple interviews, and even go out on a couple of kayaks with us. Check out the segment below:

 

Credit: ABC 10News (and shoutout to Peter, one of our managers)

 

Bottom line: grab your swimsuits and snorkels and celebrate the warm water while it lasts - because if I know anything about the Pacific Ocean here in California, it's going to get cold again

 

It's getting hot in here

 

How Two Beach Bums Started a Successful Lifestyle Company


It all began with a few kayaks and an old pickup truck.

When the recession struck in 2008, Michael Samer and Christopher Lynch quickly discovered that they didn’t have a ton of career options, especially for graduates fresh out of college. What they did have was the beach, an unemployed status, a lot of time and nothing to lose.

These humble beginnings are the origins of Everyday California. It was a little adventure company run out of a storage shed in La Jolla by a couple of beach bums with a big idea: share the California lifestyle with the world.

 

The original beach bums, Michael Samer (left) and Chris Lynch (right)

 

Compared to today, the image is comical - the first iteration was a small crew organizing and leading tours, cleaning gear and scheduling more tours on a cell phone whenever they had a free moment. At times it was brutal, but they soon realized something special was happening.

Things went quick. The storage unit was replaced by a shop, a few more people joined the crew, they got some more gear and started looking like a real business. This was the big-leagues, they thought. This was success.

 

Big-league success for the salty crew

But in time, they outgrew the first shop and found a bigger space. And then they outgrew the second shop. And the third. Now the location now is bigger and better than it’s ever been.

All the while something else was in development. There was another unique opportunity - visitors from all over the world were visiting the shop and getting a taste of the California people know and love. Mike and Chris wanted to leave them with more than just a great memory, something tangible as well.

This was the full realization of Everyday California’s growth. It’s transformed from an adventure company into a full-blown lifestyle brand, making waves in the community and spreading good vibes across the globe through an awesome selection of California designed apparel.

 

The current Everyday California shop in La Jolla, CA

 

This is the Everyday California of today. It stands for all things CA: from North to South, from massive forests full of towering Sequoias to rocky beaches with walking access only, from the tech giants in Silicon valley to mom and-pop stores selling overstuffed sandwiches down the street from our shop.

We hope you’ll join us in our mission to share California with the rest of the world.

 


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