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Meet The Machines That Are Reinventing Recycling

Save your bottles, because soon they might be worth the cost of a trip on the subway.

Especially if you live in Turkey. Istanbul, the country’s capital, just installed 25 smart recycling machines that have the ability to sort, crush, shred, and store plastic that can then be taken out of the machine and recycled. The only thing the machines can’t do is collect the plastic material themselves, which led to an pretty innovative idea:

If you recycle using one of these machines, you’ll be rewarded with credits to ride on the subway, or another form of public transportation in the city. The program is a part of an effort to improve the recycling rates in Istanbul, which are low throughout the country.

 

 

The idea feels (and looks) like a futuristic, eco-friendly bartering system that you might expect from a Star Wars or Blade Runner movie. But in truth, it’s a great way to break past the unfortunate reality of recycling—a lot of people simply don’t do it.

For some, this begs the question: why do people need external motivation to recycle? Isn’t the threat of a planet covered in plastic and marine life choking on plastic enough of a reason to separate waste?

It’s an interesting question, and the answer is more complicated than you might expect. For many of us—especially in California, where easy-to-use recycling institutions are in place—it can be difficult to imagine why people wouldn’t recycle. It’s so simple, right?

Not always, and reasons vary. In a small study of the psychology behind why people don’t recycle, The Huffington Post identified three types of non-recyclers: people who don’t have time, people who are confused by the systems in place, and people who don’t see the benefits of regular recycling.

For each of these types, their poor recycling habits stem from a system that’s failed them: if it takes too much time, then it’s probable that there isn’t an easy, effective way to recycle; if the methods available to recycle are unclear, then there might be a confusing system in place; if they deny or are unaware of why recycling is important, than perhaps there isn’t a clear incentive available.

From the same article, Brian Iacoviello, a professor at the Icahn School of Medicine, says, “Recycling is a behavior. Much like exercising or eating healthily, people often engage in this behavior less than they should.”

And of course, everyone ‘should’ recycle regularly: when done correctly, recycling saves energy and material costs, reduces landfill waste, and keeps harmful materials out of the oceans.

It would seem then that the biggest restrictor is the disconnect between the action of recycling and it’s eventual benefits. Since the positive result of a regular recycling habit is gradual, some people are unable to place it’s importance above the inconvenience of sorting waste.

This is why this method of recycling: providing an immediate advantage to recycling—credits for public transportation—is genius, as it increases the immediate value of recycling over it’s inconvenience.
 

Me and my plastic bottles are moving to Istanbul

 

How Two Beach Bums Started a Successful Lifestyle Company


It all began with a few kayaks and an old pickup truck.

When the recession struck in 2008, Michael Samer and Christopher Lynch quickly discovered that they didn’t have a ton of career options, especially for graduates fresh out of college. What they did have was the beach, an unemployed status, a lot of time and nothing to lose.

These humble beginnings are the origins of Everyday California. It was a little adventure company run out of a storage shed in La Jolla by a couple of beach bums with a big idea: share the California lifestyle with the world.

 

The original beach bums, Michael Samer (left) and Chris Lynch (right)

 

Compared to today, the image is comical - the first iteration was a small crew organizing and leading tours, cleaning gear and scheduling more tours on a cell phone whenever they had a free moment. At times it was brutal, but they soon realized something special was happening.

Things went quick. The storage unit was replaced by a shop, a few more people joined the crew, they got some more gear and started looking like a real business. This was the big-leagues, they thought. This was success.

 

Big-league success for the salty crew

But in time, they outgrew the first shop and found a bigger space. And then they outgrew the second shop. And the third. Now the location now is bigger and better than it’s ever been.

All the while something else was in development. There was another unique opportunity - visitors from all over the world were visiting the shop and getting a taste of the California people know and love. Mike and Chris wanted to leave them with more than just a great memory, something tangible as well.

This was the full realization of Everyday California’s growth. It’s transformed from an adventure company into a full-blown lifestyle brand, making waves in the community and spreading good vibes across the globe through an awesome selection of California designed apparel.

 

The current Everyday California shop in La Jolla, CA

 

This is the Everyday California of today. It stands for all things CA: from North to South, from massive forests full of towering Sequoias to rocky beaches with walking access only, from the tech giants in Silicon valley to mom and-pop stores selling overstuffed sandwiches down the street from our shop.

We hope you’ll join us in our mission to share California with the rest of the world.

 

 

Meet The Machines That Are Reinventing Recycling

Save your bottles, because soon they might be worth the cost of a trip on the subway.

Especially if you live in Turkey. Istanbul, the country’s capital, just installed 25 smart recycling machines that have the ability to sort, crush, shred, and store plastic that can then be taken out of the machine and recycled. The only thing the machines can’t do is collect the plastic material themselves, which led to an pretty innovative idea:

If you recycle using one of these machines, you’ll be rewarded with credits to ride on the subway, or another form of public transportation in the city. The program is a part of an effort to improve the recycling rates in Istanbul, which are low throughout the country.

 

 

The idea feels (and looks) like a futuristic, eco-friendly bartering system that you might expect from a Star Wars or Blade Runner movie. But in truth, it’s a great way to break past the unfortunate reality of recycling—a lot of people simply don’t do it.

For some, this begs the question: why do people need external motivation to recycle? Isn’t the threat of a planet covered in plastic and marine life choking on plastic enough of a reason to separate waste?

It’s an interesting question, and the answer is more complicated than you might expect. For many of us—especially in California, where easy-to-use recycling institutions are in place—it can be difficult to imagine why people wouldn’t recycle. It’s so simple, right?

Not always, and reasons vary. In a small study of the psychology behind why people don’t recycle, The Huffington Post identified three types of non-recyclers: people who don’t have time, people who are confused by the systems in place, and people who don’t see the benefits of regular recycling.

For each of these types, their poor recycling habits stem from a system that’s failed them: if it takes too much time, then it’s probable that there isn’t an easy, effective way to recycle; if the methods available to recycle are unclear, then there might be a confusing system in place; if they deny or are unaware of why recycling is important, than perhaps there isn’t a clear incentive available.

From the same article, Brian Iacoviello, a professor at the Icahn School of Medicine, says, “Recycling is a behavior. Much like exercising or eating healthily, people often engage in this behavior less than they should.”

And of course, everyone ‘should’ recycle regularly: when done correctly, recycling saves energy and material costs, reduces landfill waste, and keeps harmful materials out of the oceans.

It would seem then that the biggest restrictor is the disconnect between the action of recycling and it’s eventual benefits. Since the positive result of a regular recycling habit is gradual, some people are unable to place it’s importance above the inconvenience of sorting waste.

This is why this method of recycling: providing an immediate advantage to recycling—credits for public transportation—is genius, as it increases the immediate value of recycling over it’s inconvenience.
 

Me and my plastic bottles are moving to Istanbul


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