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The United States of California

Venture Capitalist and Silicon Valley extraordinaire Tim Draper has long been obsessed with an idea - split California into smaller states. For the first time in his quest to have the state break up with itself, the idea will go to the ballot for residents to vote on this November.

Draper’s first edition of this break up included 6 pieces of California pie, with proposals for future states including Jefferson (infamous for being the source of 60% of the country’s marijuana) and Silicon Valley.

 

Tim Draper, the driving force behind the Cal 3 movement

 

But after he failed to receive the support needed to move the proposal from his desk to the voting booth, Draper glued his fractured California and went back to the drawing board.

After a few years of secession silence, he came out with a new plan called ‘Cal 3’. The idea is essentially the same, it’s “a great new plan to make California whole again by breaking it apart,” just as Stephen Colbert joked in 2014 as Draper campaigned his original idea.

However, the new plan is twice as simple as before, if you do the math. Split California into 3 states, not 6, and simply label them North California, California (new), and South California.

But why even bother dropping the -ern in North and South California (it sounds a bit off) and split into 3 separate states?

Draper and his tri-state separatists represent an opinion that dates back to the formation of California in 1850. The sentiment goes that California, in all its vastness, space, and diversity is simply too large to properly govern.

 

The three Californias and their counties as proposed by Cal 3

 

The proposed split, however, claims it would turn a thinly stretched state government into three smaller, more precise governments better fit to serve the needs of their citizens.

Draper’s proposal does have some sense to it. Techies in Silicon Valley have very different ideas of what an ideal government looks like in comparison to farmers in central California. Many think our state is more like a small country than a part of a larger union, which have sparked ideas of succession. (Calexit, anyone?)

While many mock Draper’s plan as ridiculous and near impossible, Californians might use the November vote to express their dissatisfaction with the current government structure. If the measure is approved by voters, it still has a difficult path in congress before the Golden State is sliced into three.

What do you think? Would a California divided against itself fail? Or are three Californias better than one?

 

Everyday California...s?

 

The United States of California

Venture Capitalist and Silicon Valley extraordinaire Tim Draper has long been obsessed with an idea - split California into smaller states. For the first time in his quest to have the state break up with itself, the idea will go to the ballot for residents to vote on this November.

Draper’s first edition of this break up included 6 pieces of California pie, with proposals for future states including Jefferson (infamous for being the source of 60% of the country’s marijuana) and Silicon Valley.

 

Tim Draper, the driving force behind the Cal 3 movement

 

But after he failed to receive the support needed to move the proposal from his desk to the voting booth, Draper glued his fractured California and went back to the drawing board.

After a few years of secession silence, he came out with a new plan called ‘Cal 3’. The idea is essentially the same, it’s “a great new plan to make California whole again by breaking it apart,” just as Stephen Colbert joked in 2014 as Draper campaigned his original idea.

However, the new plan is twice as simple as before, if you do the math. Split California into 3 states, not 6, and simply label them North California, California (new), and South California.

But why even bother dropping the -ern in North and South California (it sounds a bit off) and split into 3 separate states?

Draper and his tri-state separatists represent an opinion that dates back to the formation of California in 1850. The sentiment goes that California, in all its vastness, space, and diversity is simply too large to properly govern.

 

The three Californias and their counties as proposed by Cal 3

 

The proposed split, however, claims it would turn a thinly stretched state government into three smaller, more precise governments better fit to serve the needs of their citizens.

Draper’s proposal does have some sense to it. Techies in Silicon Valley have very different ideas of what an ideal government looks like in comparison to farmers in central California. Many think our state is more like a small country than a part of a larger union, which have sparked ideas of succession. (Calexit, anyone?)

While many mock Draper’s plan as ridiculous and near impossible, Californians might use the November vote to express their dissatisfaction with the current government structure. If the measure is approved by voters, it still has a difficult path in congress before the Golden State is sliced into three.

What do you think? Would a California divided against itself fail? Or are three Californias better than one?

Everyday California...s?

 

How Two Beach Bums Started a Successful Lifestyle Company


It all began with a few kayaks and an old pickup truck.

When the recession struck in 2008, Michael Samer and Christopher Lynch quickly discovered that they didn’t have a ton of career options, especially for graduates fresh out of college. What they did have was the beach, an unemployed status, a lot of time and nothing to lose.

These humble beginnings are the origins of Everyday California. It was a little adventure company run out of a storage shed in La Jolla by a couple of beach bums with a big idea: share the California lifestyle with the world.

 

The original beach bums, Michael Samer (left) and Chris Lynch (right)

 

Compared to today, the image is comical - the first iteration was a small crew organizing and leading tours, cleaning gear and scheduling more tours on a cell phone whenever they had a free moment. At times it was brutal, but they soon realized something special was happening.

Things went quick. The storage unit was replaced by a shop, a few more people joined the crew, they got some more gear and started looking like a real business. This was the big-leagues, they thought. This was success.

 

Big-league success for the salty crew

But in time, they outgrew the first shop and found a bigger space. And then they outgrew the second shop. And the third. Now the location now is bigger and better than it’s ever been.

All the while something else was in development. There was another unique opportunity - visitors from all over the world were visiting the shop and getting a taste of the California people know and love. Mike and Chris wanted to leave them with more than just a great memory, something tangible as well.

This was the full realization of Everyday California’s growth. It’s transformed from an adventure company into a full-blown lifestyle brand, making waves in the community and spreading good vibes across the globe through an awesome selection of California designed apparel.

 

The current Everyday California shop in La Jolla, CA

 

This is the Everyday California of today. It stands for all things CA: from North to South, from massive forests full of towering Sequoias to rocky beaches with walking access only, from the tech giants in Silicon valley to mom and-pop stores selling overstuffed sandwiches down the street from our shop.

We hope you’ll join us in our mission to share California with the rest of the world.

 


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