FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $50

 

The Straw That Broke Starbuck's Back

Starbucks is ending it’s long relationship with plastic straws, stating that all 28,000 of their locations will have them kicked out for good by 2020.

 

 

The world’s largest coffee chain is taking some responsibility for the huge amount of plastic waste that’s not properly recycled. Starbucks goes through about 1 billion plastic straws every year, and many of those straws end up in our oceans.

Recently, straws have had their time in the crime-light as an unrecycled villain. They’re currently the trendiest plastic item to ban, with cities like Seattle and celebrities like Neil degrasse Tyson encouraging the world to #stopsucking and get rid of straws for good.

 

But is banning straws the solution to our plastic waste problem?

Straws are certainly a part of the problem. According to For A Strawless Ocean, there will be more plastic than fish in our ocean by 2050 at the current rate of waste that’s dumped into the sea. Americans use and toss about 500 million straws every day. That’s more than 182 billion (!) straws every year.

A huge part of that waste is single-use plastics, which are plastic products only used once before being tossed, like straws and red party cups. These products are easy targets for environmentalists since alternatives - reusable or recyclable cups and straws - are becoming more and more available.

As for Starbucks, cold drinks will be served with a recyclable strawless lid, although environmentally friendly straw alternatives will be available for frappuccinos or customers who can’t swallow the strawless movement.

If the trendiness of banning these suckers continues, we might witness the complete annhilation of plastic straws. Joining Seattle, Washington DC is looking to eliminate them entirely by 2019, and if our nation's capital is on board with the ban, other cities are likely to follow suit, and surely other companies will initiate their own straw exit strategy.

 

Plastic straws suck

 

The Straw That Broke Starbuck's Back

Starbucks is ending it’s long relationship with plastic straws, stating that all 28,000 of their locations will have them kicked out for good by 2020.

 

 

The world’s largest coffee chain is taking some responsibility for the huge amount of plastic waste that’s not properly recycled. Starbucks goes through about 1 billion plastic straws every year, and many of those straws end up in our oceans.

Recently, straws have had their time in the crime-light as an unrecycled villain. They’re currently the trendiest plastic item to ban, with cities like Seattle and celebrities like Neil degrasse Tyson encouraging the world to #stopsucking and get rid of straws for good.

 

But is banning straws the solution to our plastic waste problem?

Straws are certainly a part of the problem. According to For A Strawless Ocean, there will be more plastic than fish in our ocean by 2050 at the current rate of waste that’s dumped into the sea. Americans use and toss about 500 million straws every day. That’s more than 182 billion (!) straws every year.

A huge part of that waste is single-use plastics, which are plastic products only used once before being tossed, like straws and red party cups. These products are easy targets for environmentalists since alternatives - reusable or recyclable cups and straws - are becoming more and more available.

As for Starbucks, cold drinks will be served with a recyclable strawless lid, although environmentally friendly straw alternatives will be available for frappuccinos or customers who can’t swallow the strawless movement.

If the trendiness of banning these suckers continues, we might witness the complete annhilation of plastic straws. Joining Seattle, Washington DC is looking to eliminate them entirely by 2019, and if our nation's capital is on board with the ban, other cities are likely to follow suit, and surely other companies will initiate their own straw exit strategy.

 

 

Plastic straws suck

 

How Two Beach Bums Started a Successful Lifestyle Company


It all began with a few kayaks and an old pickup truck.

When the recession struck in 2008, Michael Samer and Christopher Lynch quickly discovered that they didn’t have a ton of career options, especially for graduates fresh out of college. What they did have was the beach, an unemployed status, a lot of time and nothing to lose.

These humble beginnings are the origins of Everyday California. It was a little adventure company run out of a storage shed in La Jolla by a couple of beach bums with a big idea: share the California lifestyle with the world.

 

The original beach bums, Michael Samer (left) and Chris Lynch (right)

 

Compared to today, the image is comical - the first iteration was a small crew organizing and leading tours, cleaning gear and scheduling more tours on a cell phone whenever they had a free moment. At times it was brutal, but they soon realized something special was happening.

Things went quick. The storage unit was replaced by a shop, a few more people joined the crew, they got some more gear and started looking like a real business. This was the big-leagues, they thought. This was success.

 

Big-league success for the salty crew

But in time, they outgrew the first shop and found a bigger space. And then they outgrew the second shop. And the third. Now the location now is bigger and better than it’s ever been.

All the while something else was in development. There was another unique opportunity - visitors from all over the world were visiting the shop and getting a taste of the California people know and love. Mike and Chris wanted to leave them with more than just a great memory, something tangible as well.

This was the full realization of Everyday California’s growth. It’s transformed from an adventure company into a full-blown lifestyle brand, making waves in the community and spreading good vibes across the globe through an awesome selection of California designed apparel.

 

The current Everyday California shop in La Jolla, CA

 

This is the Everyday California of today. It stands for all things CA: from North to South, from massive forests full of towering Sequoias to rocky beaches with walking access only, from the tech giants in Silicon valley to mom and-pop stores selling overstuffed sandwiches down the street from our shop.

We hope you’ll join us in our mission to share California with the rest of the world.

 


Leave a comment


Also in Everyday Thoughts

Meet The Machines That Are Reinventing Recycling
Meet The Machines That Are Reinventing Recycling

These "reverse vending machines" take your plastic bottles and turn them into credit for public transportation in Istanbul.
Read More
8 Spots With San Diego's Best Views And Lookout Points
8 Spots With San Diego's Best Views And Lookout Points

We've compiled a list of San Diego's best views for you to make the most of America's Finest City.
Read More
Surfing Just Became The Official Sport Of California
Surfing Just Became The Official Sport Of California

Surfing, California’s favorite pastime, just became the official sport of the Golden State. Celebratory surf session, anyone?
Read More

Shop Our Instagram